In the introduction to her gorgeous new book, Haute Couture Ateliers (Vendome, $75), Hélène Farnault writes, “Fashion embodies all sorts of contradictions. For a certain period of time, it exerts a broad appeal, and yet its nature is ephemeral, allowing each individual to alter their style and look, to ignore existing dictates.” Haute couture, it stands to reason, is thus a fashion of willful ignorance. Designers must say, Yes, I know this is not how neoprene—or tulle, or fringe, or lace, or what-have-you—has historically been used, but for this moment let’s pretend that isn’t so. 
Read more about Fanault’s book at Architectural Digest, here.

In the introduction to her gorgeous new book, Haute Couture Ateliers (Vendome, $75), Hélène Farnault writes, “Fashion embodies all sorts of contradictions. For a certain period of time, it exerts a broad appeal, and yet its nature is ephemeral, allowing each individual to alter their style and look, to ignore existing dictates.” Haute couture, it stands to reason, is thus a fashion of willful ignorance. Designers must say, Yes, I know this is not how neoprene—or tulle, or fringe, or lace, or what-have-you—has historically been used, but for this moment let’s pretend that isn’t so.

Read more about Fanault’s book at Architectural Digest, here.

thisistheverge:

Even the best photojournalists can’t make video game war photography work If anyone could capture the terror, desperation, and occasional joy of surviving the apocalypse, you’d think it might be award-winning war photographer Ashley Gilbertson — a man who spent years covering the Iraq invasion for The New York Times. This week, for Time magazine, Gilbertson “embedded” himself in (also award-winning) video game The Last of Us, using its built-in photo mode to capture shots of protagonists Joel and Ellie making their way across a dead but still hostile landscape. Gilbertson, who developed post-traumatic stress disorder during the war, found the game too bloody, intense, and disconcerting to even play himself; he took the controls only to operate the camera.
But the photos? The photos, even at their most dramatic and well-shot, are bland.

thisistheverge:

Even the best photojournalists can’t make video game war photography work
If anyone could capture the terror, desperation, and occasional joy of surviving the apocalypse, you’d think it might be award-winning war photographer Ashley Gilbertson — a man who spent years covering the Iraq invasion for The New York Times. This week, for Time magazine, Gilbertson “embedded” himself in (also award-winning) video game The Last of Us, using its built-in photo mode to capture shots of protagonists Joel and Ellie making their way across a dead but still hostile landscape. Gilbertson, who developed post-traumatic stress disorder during the war, found the game too bloody, intense, and disconcerting to even play himself; he took the controls only to operate the camera.

But the photos? The photos, even at their most dramatic and well-shot, are bland.

livelymorgue:

May 15, 1977: An article in The Times Magazine presented President Jimmy Carter, early in his single term, as a “Maestro of the Media,” explaining his success on the screen. “These are the glory days,” reported Richard Reeves, “and the man can seem to do no electronic wrong.” To the left of the president’s ear, Barry Jagoda gave some last-minute advice. Photo: Theresa Zabala/The New York Times
ZoomInfo
livelymorgue:

May 15, 1977: An article in The Times Magazine presented President Jimmy Carter, early in his single term, as a “Maestro of the Media,” explaining his success on the screen. “These are the glory days,” reported Richard Reeves, “and the man can seem to do no electronic wrong.” To the left of the president’s ear, Barry Jagoda gave some last-minute advice. Photo: Theresa Zabala/The New York Times
ZoomInfo

livelymorgue:

May 15, 1977: An article in The Times Magazine presented President Jimmy Carter, early in his single term, as a “Maestro of the Media,” explaining his success on the screen. “These are the glory days,” reported Richard Reeves, “and the man can seem to do no electronic wrong.” To the left of the president’s ear, Barry Jagoda gave some last-minute advice. Photo: Theresa Zabala/The New York Times

theparisreview:

On the Met’s new Charles James retrospective: “The Met seems to be telling us—showing us—that we should view [dress and fashion] as high art. This is not a new argument, of course, but in spite of past scholarly and curatorial efforts, it has never decisively taken hold … James would seem the perfect antidote, and in many ways he is: a great designer who was never a celebrity (few outside the field of fashion have ever heard of him), an inveterate craftsman who was also a genuinely imaginative artist—a sculptor of satin and silk willing to sacrifice everything including profits for the perfect seam…”
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

theparisreview:

On the Met’s new Charles James retrospective: “The Met seems to be telling us—showing us—that we should view [dress and fashion] as high art. This is not a new argument, of course, but in spite of past scholarly and curatorial efforts, it has never decisively taken hold … James would seem the perfect antidote, and in many ways he is: a great designer who was never a celebrity (few outside the field of fashion have ever heard of him), an inveterate craftsman who was also a genuinely imaginative artist—a sculptor of satin and silk willing to sacrifice everything including profits for the perfect seam…”

For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

Wolf in White Van by John Darnielle audiobook excerpt

lprnyc:

Listen to John Darnielle read the beginning of his new novel Wolf in White Van. The Mountain Goats frontman is coming to LPR evening Monday for a discussion/reading with John Hodgman.

(via hodgman)

hyperallergic:

(via Overheard in the Art World)
Hello, my beloved art world. I am back again, by popular demand, to deliver to you those lovely phrases that we all utter amongst our boastful, arrogant, self-involved, art-loving selves.
READ MORE

“I like this show, but why is it empty in here? Should I not like this show? — Jonathan Monk opening at Casey Kaplan

hyperallergic:

(via Overheard in the Art World)

Hello, my beloved art world. I am back again, by popular demand, to deliver to you those lovely phrases that we all utter amongst our boastful, arrogant, self-involved, art-loving selves.

READ MORE

“I like this show, but why is it empty in here? Should I not like this show?
— Jonathan Monk opening at Casey Kaplan

humansofnewyork:

"The right to protest is very limited in Tibet. But the Chinese laws allow for ethnic minorities to practice their traditions. So every Wednesday, to demonstrate solidarity, Tibetans all over the world express their culture. They speak Tibetan, eat at Tibetan restaurants, and wear traditional Tibetan clothing. It’s a form of silent protest." 
(Dharamshala, India)

humansofnewyork:

"The right to protest is very limited in Tibet. But the Chinese laws allow for ethnic minorities to practice their traditions. So every Wednesday, to demonstrate solidarity, Tibetans all over the world express their culture. They speak Tibetan, eat at Tibetan restaurants, and wear traditional Tibetan clothing. It’s a form of silent protest." 

(Dharamshala, India)

slaughterhouse90210:

“Is there nowhere in an American house where one may be by one’s self?”― Edith Wharton, The Age of Innocence

slaughterhouse90210:

“Is there nowhere in an American house where one may be by one’s self?”
― Edith Wharton,
The Age of Innocence

slaughterhouse90210:

“It was like when you make a move in chess and just as you take your finger off the piece, you see the mistake you’ve made, and there’s this panic because you don’t know yet the scale of disaster you’ve left yourself open to.”—Kazuo Ishiguro, Never Let Me Go

slaughterhouse90210:

“It was like when you make a move in chess and just as you take your finger off the piece, you see the mistake you’ve made, and there’s this panic because you don’t know yet the scale of disaster you’ve left yourself open to.”
—Kazuo Ishiguro, Never Let Me Go